Smart Goals

It’s coming up to the start of a new year, which is always a fantastic time to think about setting some new goals! Of course, goals can be set at any time – but a key factor in doing so is to make sure that they are achievable.

As mentioned on Instagram, you can do this by Thinking SMART; by using the SMART acronym, your goals can be more reachable. You can also use the same system to set short- and long-term goals!

S - Specific

When creating your goal, you should know exactly what it is you want to achieve.

M - Measurable

There should be a way to tell when your goal is complete, and to check your progress along the way.

A - Attainable

It should be a challenge; not too easy, and not too hard. This is something you want!

R - Realistic

Using the resources and the time available to you, and putting in the right amount of effort, your goal should be achievable.

T - Timely

Your goal should be useful to you at this time in your life; you should have time for it to be completed properly. It should also be completed in the time you have given yourself for it.

Short term goals

These are usually something that be reached in a few days or weeks and can sometimes be part of the build up in a long-term goal. For example, improving your mobility can come in several steps, and you might want to start on one movement for a short while before moving onto something more complicated. By breaking long-term goals into short-term ones, the long-term goals can be more manageable.

An example that can also be used is in saving up money:

If you want to save £1000 as a long-term goal, this can be divided into smaller goals – such as working six hours a week at £9 an hour for two weeks. After you complete this goal, you can set a new one.

S - Specific

The goal is made specific by the number of hours specified, and the amount of time you have chosen to dedicate to this task.

M - Measurable

You can measure this goal by recording how many hours you have worked each week.

A - Attainable

This goal is attainable because it depends on your making the effort to fulfil your working schedule.

R - Realistic

Setting realistic goals is important; if you had set a goal for more hours that didn’t account for other factors – family responsibilities, homework, activities, exercise – then it wouldn’t be as realistic.

T - Timely

Because you have set a realistic goal, with an appropriate amount of time dedicated, it will fit in your current schedule.

Long-term goals

A long-term goal can be set over many months, or even years. We can use the same example as above to look at SMART for a long-term goal: If you want to save £1000 as a long-term goal.

S - Specific

It is specific because you know the amount you want to save.

M - Measurable

You can measure your progress because you can record how much you have saved, and how much you have left to save.

A - Attainable

This goal might be more challenging if you do not have a steady income. But if you do, then it is something that can be attained over a period of time.

R - Realistic

If you stick to saving a certain amount of the money you earn, and keep saving, then the goal is realistic.

T - Timely

Saving the £1000 as a long-term goal is something that you want to achieve – likely for something big. If you add an end date to this, such as two years, then you have a workable timeline in which to achieve your goal.

Another great example of a short-term and long-term goal is Couch to 5k. In this process, the short-term goals are daily and weekly runs, which help you build up to running for 30 minutes or running 5k.

Setting goals is a great way to visualise things that you want and using SMART can help you achieve that. So, have a think – what are you hoping to achieve? And how are you going to use SMART to help you get there?

And good luck! I know you can do this!


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